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Fri 16 June 2023
As an employee, you're not expected to work at the same company forever. Whether you're looking to advance within your current organization or explore new opportunities elsewhere, having a strong resume that highlights your accomplishments and skills is essential. 

Building your resume continuously throughout your jobs allows you to capture and showcase your accomplishments, demonstrate career progression, reflect continuous learning, seize unexpected opportunities, tailor your resume for specific positions, build confidence and self-awareness, prepare for performance reviews, and demonstrate career commitment. Here are some reasons why direct reports should prioritize resume-building throughout their careers:

  • Documenting Your Accomplishments: Continuously updating your resume allows you to document your accomplishments and contributions while they are fresh in your mind. By capturing your achievements in real-time, you ensure that no valuable experiences or skills are overlooked or forgotten. This documentation serves as evidence of your capabilities and helps you present a comprehensive picture of your professional growth.
  • Showcasing Career Progression: A continuously updated resume demonstrates your career progression over time. It allows potential employers to see how you have advanced, taken on increasing responsibilities, and acquired new skills and experiences. This progression showcases your ability to adapt, learn, and succeed in different roles, making you a more attractive candidate for future opportunities.
  • Reflecting Continuous Learning: Updating your resume regularly reflects your commitment to continuous learning and professional development. It shows that you actively seek new challenges, acquire new skills, and stay updated with industry trends. Employers value candidates who demonstrate a growth mindset and a willingness to expand their knowledge and expertise.
  • Seizing Unexpected Opportunities: Opportunities can arise unexpectedly, such as a new job opening or a chance to work on an exciting project. Having an updated resume readily available allows you to seize these opportunities promptly. It enables you to respond to job postings or network with potential employers without delay, increasing your chances of being considered for desirable positions.
  • Tailoring for Specific Opportunities: Each job opportunity is unique, with its own requirements and desired qualifications. By continuously building your resume, you can easily tailor it to match the specific needs of different positions. This customization allows you to highlight the most relevant skills, experiences, and accomplishments that align with the job requirements, increasing your chances of being selected for interviews and ultimately landing the job.
  • Building Confidence and Self-Awareness: Updating your resume provides an opportunity for self-reflection and self-awareness. As you review your accomplishments and experiences, you gain a deeper understanding of your strengths, skills, and professional journey. This increased self-awareness boosts your confidence and helps you articulate your value proposition during interviews and networking interactions.

However, it can be challenging to recall and effectively communicate all the tangible contributions and achievements you've made throughout your career. This is where AIM Insights, a powerful performance management tool, comes into play. By keeping track of your accomplishments at work, AIM Insights helps you build an impressive resume that showcases your value and potential to prospective employers.

One of the key features of AIM Insights is its ability to provide you with tangible portfolio tasks that demonstrate your impact on the organization. These tasks are curated based on your performance evaluations and feedback from your manager, allowing you to focus on the areas where you excelled. By completing these tasks and documenting the results, you create a tangible record of your achievements and contributions. This not only helps you recall specific examples when updating your resume but also provides concrete evidence of your abilities and the value you bring to the table.

A notable aspect of AIM Insights is its emphasis on SMART goals (Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Time-bound). When you view the "goals" section on AIM Insights, you can see the percentage of SMART goals you've set and accomplished. 

This feature not only encourages goal-oriented behavior but also provides a clear indicator of your performance and progress. It showcases your ability to set high-impact objectives that contribute to team success and drive overall performance. This information is invaluable when it comes to presenting yourself as an effective and goal-driven professional on your resume.

Another valuable aspect of AIM Insights is its ability to generate an impact score average based on your evaluations. This score reflects the overall impact of your work and highlights your contributions to the team's success. Being able to quantify your impact in this way is immensely beneficial when updating your resume. Prospective employers are always looking for candidates who can demonstrate measurable results and tangible achievements, and AIM Insights provides the data to back up your claims.

Furthermore, AIM Insights allows you to compare your impact scores with those of your peers. This feature provides context and perspective on your performance, showing how you stack up against others in your team or department. It offers valuable insights into your relative strengths and areas for improvement, allowing you to tailor your resume to highlight your unique abilities and stand out from the competition.

By utilizing AIM Insights, you gain several advantages when it comes to building your resume: 
  1. Firstly, you have access to tangible metrics and portfolio tasks that demonstrate your accomplishments and contributions. This gives you a structured framework to showcase your skills and abilities effectively. 
  2. Secondly, you can leverage the feedback and evaluations provided by your manager through AIM Insights. This feedback not only gives you a clear understanding of your performance but also serves as valuable evidence of your capabilities when constructing your resume.
  3. Lastly, AIM Insights tracks your progress and growth within your position and the organization. It provides a comprehensive record of your achievements, milestones, and professional development. This information is invaluable when it comes to updating your resume over time, as you can accurately reflect your career trajectory and demonstrate continuous improvement and growth.

AIM Insights is a powerful performance management tool that simplifies the process of keeping track of your accomplishments and helps you build a compelling resume. By providing tangible portfolio tasks, tracking SMART goals, generating impact scores, and facilitating manager feedback, AIM Insights empowers you to effectively showcase your skills and achievements. Whether you're aiming for career advancement within your current organization or exploring new opportunities, AIM Insights equips you with the tools and data you need to present yourself as a high-performing, results-driven professional.


Wed 7 June 2023
Thomas Edison tried roughly 1,200 experiments before discovering the light bulb. When asked what it felt like to fail 1,200 times, he responded that he didn’t fail 1,200 times, but rather he learned 1,200 ways to not make a light bulb. 

Good thing he was the CEO of his own company!

Imagine the workplace today. How much grace and patience do we give people to succeed?

More importantly, how much grace and patience do leaders say they give their people compared to reality? Most leaders are quick to state they support this idea, but it’s rare to see them follow through.

Instead, we see that being a “perfectionist” is the real preferred character trait from leaders that are hesitant to embrace taking chances. 

When thinking about the best, most innovative companies in the world, the core theme that aligns them all together is this emphasis on progress, not perfection. 

The companies that thrive, regardless of what is going on the economy, are the ones that are nimble enough to run multiple experiments at the same time, diagnose which experiments are achieving progress, and then experiment further until a desired result is achieved. 

This article overviews what both employees and companies can do to build a culture that embraces mistakes.

Employees:

As an employee, regardless of whether you are in a leadership position, you might wonder how much of an impact you, individually, can have on your company’s culture. You might also be wondering if these ideas run the risk of getting you fired.

Disclaimer: Applying these ideas may get you fired.

If you are at a company that would fire you for following the suggestions below, you are likely miserable at this company, and it is time for you to move on. Following these tips will expedite that process and help you move into a better work situation. Also, applying these principles effectively, and documenting them, will make you an extremely attractive candidate to any organization that does in fact embrace mistakes.

  1. Be a scientist
Being a scientist means that you run a series of experiments. To experiment means to introduce one new variable while holding all other variables constant to observe if a different (either positive or negative) result is achieved.

Examples:

●       Experimenting within the company
o   Handling a frustrating boss – Infrequent feedback from your boss can be frustrating, especially when your only chance to learn about your work is during an annual performance review. It’s nerve-wracking waiting to find out how they view your performance when feedback is so rare. If you’d like to change this, try different and unique ways to gather their feedback – perhaps ask them for help, ask them if you are making a mistake, or flat out ask for feedback.
▪        Pro tipTry documenting this process. Write down your current behavior, note what behavior you are changing, and then what your hypothesized results will be. Then create a timeline for when you will evaluate the results and use this to measure the change. Most people give up after half-heartedly trying one thing and assume their situation is doomed. By writing down the experiment, it is easier to be objective about the results and be willing to try new experiments.
o   Handling a frustrating direct report – If your direct report isn’t listening to you or not getting all of the work that you would like accomplished, you are going to have to try something different. Try a new method for better understanding their priority order, their concerns, and their roadblocks – perhaps ask them different questions to help you better understand their situation, schedule more frequent 1:1’s, or communicate why achieving whatever task needs to get done is important to you.
●       Experimenting Externally
o   Sales – If you are struggling to meet your sales numbers, allocate a certain amount of time every week to trying something new that could work. Follow the pro tip above for some help on how to effectively evaluate your experiments.
o   Operations – If you are discovering that there is a communication gap with the handoff of work between departments, communicate to both departments a new strategy for increasing the efficiency, what your hypotheses are, what the timeline of the experiment is, and what success will look like if success is achieved. Also explain that if success isn’t achieved, that a new strategy will be implemented until the desired result is achieved.

This is just the framework for how to experiment. The actual strategies you deploy for working through your work scenario are likely different and better than the strategies I proposed because you know your work situation and yourself best.

2. Communicate your experiments, hypotheses, and results throughout the company
People at your company may wonder why you are acting differently. By writing down your experiments, hypotheses and results, it is easier to communicate with others why you are acting differently. 

However, if your experiment involves other people you are working with, you can’t inform them that you are changing your behavior. If you do, you will be altering multiple variables, rendering your experiment moot. 

For example, if you want your boss to stop showing up late to meetings with you so you decide that you are going to ask your boss’s secretary to schedule their meeting with you for 5 minutes before it is actually supposed to start, if you tell your boss you are doing that, your boss is going to adjust their behavior because they now know this information.

3. Document results so others can learn from you
This is especially important for helping convey why you have an opinion on a matter moving forward. If you properly document your experiments and your results, your perspective will hold much more weight than somebody who is just giving their opinion.

Advice for Leaders at Companies:

  1. Remove “perfectionists”
Anyone who refers to themselves as a perfectionist should be approached with caution and wrangled appropriately. A perfectionist is somebody, based on their current knowledge base and skill set, that will perform the same activity over and over again the exact same way. These people are not interested in learning new ways of doing things because the amount of knowledge they would need to alter their behavior is too great, so any time spent learning a new behavior isn’t worth it. These people are also unwilling to experiment as the fear of making a mistake or not having an experiment align with the hypotheses is too great to overcome. 

Perfection is the enemy of progress. Perfectionists will do everything in their power to not change anything because they have spent all of their time and energy becoming “perfect” at one way of acting.

2. Be collaborative when diagnosing failed experiments
When an experiment is tried and it is determined it didn’t work how you were expecting, invite the entire team to participate in the evaluation process of why it failed and what can be tried in the future to achieve different results. 

This also communicates that failure is okay. 

This is particularly important for leading global teams, especially global teams that were raised in societies with different norms and perspectives on mistakes and failed experiments. 

For example, a technical executive was leading a team of software developers, mostly from India. He ended up learning that a member of his team made a mistake months ago but told nobody. He tried to fix it himself, but the problem got worse and eventually the client called him to inform him that they were pulling their contract because of the technical difficulties they were encountering. Some learning lessons he took from this were that he needs to have a process for identifying these errors and that he needs to build a culture where his team feels comfortable being vulnerable, honest and open when a mistake is made.

3. Document then celebrate the learning lessons
Once a failed experiment has been diagnosed, document it for the entire company to learn from. Holding an experiment and learning that the hypothesis didn’t work is fine. But running the same experiment over and over again and achieving the same undesired result, is not fine. Failed experiments shouldn’t be locked in some vault where only the experimenters can reflect on. Failed experiments should be celebrated! This communicates that learning from failure is endorsed by the organization and creates positive memories associated with lessons learned. 

If you are interested in continuing the dialogue, the Ambition In Motion YouTube channel will be hosting weekly live panel sessions until July 27th, 2023 with executives discussing this topic of How to Build a Culture of Embracing Mistakes.

Fri 19 May 2023
Effective interdepartmental communication is paramount for high-level executives seeking to drive organizational success. Strong communication between departments fosters collaboration, expedites decision-making, and enhances overall business performance.

There have been many instances in which a manager has required something of another department, and due to difficult communication channels, has either been forced to go through an arduous process, or having to refer the matter to senior leadership. This creates a chain of inefficiencies which should be addressed to allow for a more streamlined business experience. Here are a few tips on how to establish this clear horizontal chain of communication. 

Please note that the phrase “horizontal communication” is used throughout this article. This is defined as lateral communication, which describes communication between departments, teams, and people who are all at equivalent levels.

  1. Establish Clear Communication Expectations- High-level executives must define and communicate clear expectations regarding interdepartmental communication. Establish guidelines concerning communication channels, preferred mediums, response times, and overall communication standards. Effectively communicate these expectations to all employees, emphasizing their significance and ensuring widespread adherence. Post these throughout the workplace and online. By setting clear communication expectations, you can then create a framework for consistent and effective interdepartmental communication.
  2. Cultivate a Culture of Open Communication- Promote a culture of openness and transparency throughout the organization. Encourage employees at all levels to freely express ideas, concerns, and suggestions. Create platforms for interdepartmental dialogue, such as regular cross-departmental meetings, forums, or collaborative projects. Lead by example by actively engaging in communication efforts, highlighting the importance of open dialogue to break down information silos and foster collaboration. Creating an open communication culture can allow greater horizontal communication throughout the company. Creating a Horizontal Mentorship Program can be critical to cultivating this culture.
  3. Facilitate Regular Interdepartmental Meetings- Schedule frequent meetings that bring together representatives from different departments. These gatherings offer an opportunity to share updates, align objectives, address challenges, and promote collaboration. Encourage active participation and ensure that meeting agendas facilitate cross-departmental communication and problem-solving. This will promote better understanding, alignment, and cooperation among departments. In addition to this, it will give your employees more opportunities to get to know people who they do not need to work with daily, further building a more integrated workforce. Regular interdepartmental meetings can also be critical for succession planning and integrating different groups of people that have be joined together via merger or acquisition.
  4. Implement Collaborative Technologies- Leverage technology to facilitate seamless interdepartmental communication. Implement collaborative tools, such as project management software, shared document repositories, and instant messaging platforms. These tools enable real-time communication, document sharing, and collaboration across departments, regardless of geographical locations. Encourage employees to utilize these tools effectively, providing necessary training and support. Leveraging technology enables executives to easily remove communication barriers, streamline information exchange, and foster efficient interdepartmental collaboration.
  5. Support Cross-Departmental Training and Development: Invest in cross-departmental training programs to enhance employees' understanding of different roles and functions. Provide opportunities for employees to learn about other departments through job rotations, mentorship programs, or cross-functional projects. This exposure fosters empathy, improves interdepartmental communication, and encourages a broader perspective among employees. By supporting cross-departmental training and development, executives promote a culture of learning, understanding, and collaboration.
  6. Cultivate Interdepartmental Communication Champions: Identify individuals who excel in interdepartmental communication and designate them as communication champions. These employees can serve as liaisons between departments, facilitating information exchange and collaboration. Encourage them to organize workshops, training sessions, or knowledge-sharing events that promote effective communication practices. Recognize and reward their efforts to motivate others to follow suit. By cultivating communication champions, executives empower employees to take ownership of interdepartmental communication, driving collaboration and fostering a culture of effective communication.
  7. Establish a Feedback Mechanism: Implement a feedback mechanism that allows employees to share their experiences, suggestions, and concerns related to interdepartmental communication. This can be achieved through regular surveys, suggestion boxes, or anonymous feedback channels. Actively review and address the feedback received, demonstrating a commitment to continuous improvement, and fostering a culture where feedback is valued and acted upon. By establishing a feedback mechanism, executives create a platform for employees to contribute to the improvement of interdepartmental communication.
  8. Lead by Example: As high-level executives, your actions and communication style set the tone for the organization. Lead by example by demonstrating active listening, empathy, and respect in your interactions with employees from different departments. Seek input from all levels, encourage diverse perspectives, and promptly address conflicts or miscommunications. Show your commitment to interdepartmental communication by actively participating in cross-departmental initiatives and projects. By leading by example, executives establish a culture of effective communication, collaboration, and mutual respect.

High-level executives play a crucial role in improving interdepartmental communication. By establishing clear expectations, cultivating a culture of open communication, leveraging collaborative technologies, supporting cross-departmental training, cultivating communication champions, implementing feedback mechanisms, and leading by example, executives can facilitate effective communication and collaboration among departments. By prioritizing and investing in interdepartmental communication, high-level executives create a professional and productive work environment that propels organizational success. 



Fri 19 May 2023
In today's highly competitive business environment, exceptional leadership skills alone may not guarantee promotions. Many great leaders often wonder why their efforts and capabilities go unnoticed when it comes to advancing their careers. 
Many outstanding leaders find themselves facing a common hurdle: effectively communicating their leadership capabilities to key decision-makers. 
Leaders often encounter struggles when it comes to effectively communicating their leadership abilities. These challenges can hinder their ability to showcase their skills, connect with their teams, and gain recognition for their accomplishments. 
However, by addressing this challenge head-on and employing strategies to enhance their communication skills, leaders can distinguish themselves from the crowd and increase their chances of promotion.
The key lies in their ability to effectively communicate their leadership prowess and demonstrate their impact. This is where AIM Insights, a cutting-edge performance management tool, comes into play.

Unleashing the Power of the AIM Insights Performance Management Tool
While possessing remarkable leadership skills, extensive experience, and a track record of success, great leaders may struggle to convey their true potential to key decision-makers. This communication gap can impede their promotion prospects, leaving them feeling undervalued and overlooked. 
AIM Insights provides actionable insights and metrics to leaders and organizations to help them improve performance, enhance communication, and drive results. AIM Insights is a robust performance management tool designed to address the challenges associated with effective communication of leadership capabilities. 
By harnessing the capabilities of AIM Insights, leaders can differentiate themselves and significantly improve their chances of promotion.
 
Here are 5 reasons why AIM Insights is the tool to help you best communicate your leadership capabilities:

  1. Comprehensive Performance Metrics:
AIM Insights provides leaders with a comprehensive array of performance metrics, enabling them to track their achievements and demonstrate their impact. These metrics encompass key performance indicators (KPIs), employee engagement levels, project success rates, and financial performance, among others. By utilizing AIM Insights, leaders can quantify their contributions and showcase their ability to drive tangible results.
2. Objective Self-Assessment:
AIM Insights facilitates objective self-assessment by allowing leaders to evaluate their strengths and weaknesses with precision. This valuable feature empowers leaders to understand their leadership capabilities better, identify areas for improvement, and capitalize on their strengths. Armed with this knowledge, leaders can refine their communication strategies to effectively highlight their competencies and achievements.
3. Goal Alignment and Progress Tracking:
AIM Insights facilitates alignment with organizational goals and tracks progress towards them. By clearly demonstrating how their leadership initiatives directly contribute to overarching objectives, leaders can position themselves as valuable assets to the organization. This alignment showcases their strategic acumen and reinforces their commitment to the company's mission, setting them apart as leaders who comprehend the bigger picture.
4. Real-Time Feedback and Coaching:
AIM Insights incorporates real-time feedback mechanisms, enabling leaders to receive timely insights on their performance. This feature facilitates continuous improvement by highlighting areas that require attention or development. Through constructive feedback and targeted coaching, leaders can enhance their leadership communication skills, making them more effective at conveying their capabilities to decision-makers.
5. Dynamic Reporting and Visualization:
AIM Insights offers dynamic reporting and visualization tools that transform complex data into compelling narratives. Leaders can leverage these tools to create visually appealing reports and presentations, effectively conveying their accomplishments and impact. By presenting data-driven insights in an accessible and engaging manner, leaders can make a lasting impression and capture the attention of key stakeholders.

Leaders face the challenge of effectively communicating their leadership capabilities to secure promotions and recognition. By acknowledging and addressing these communication struggles head-on, leaders can distinguish themselves from the crowd. 
Employing techniques such as crafting compelling narratives, emphasizing results, fostering effective listening, embracing authenticity, and continuously honing communication skills will enhance leaders' ability to communicate their unique leadership capabilities. 
AIM Insights, a powerful performance management tool, empowers leaders to overcome these obstacles and distinguish themselves from the crowd. By utilizing AIM Insights' comprehensive performance metrics, objective self-assessment, goal alignment, real-time feedback, and dynamic reporting features, leaders can enhance their communication of leadership capabilities. 
Through the utilization of AIM Insights, leaders can position themselves as high-impact performers, increasing their chances of promotion and ensuring their exceptional leadership skills are recognized and rewarded accordingly.


Fri 12 May 2023
On March 30th, 2023, Ambition in Motion hosted an executive symposium with panelists Laura Iannelli, Syriac Joswin, and Chris Mashburn. These symposiums are an effective way to network with successful executives and get to learn some of what makes them good leaders. High-level executives and thought leaders come together to discuss industry trends, share insights, and best practices, and engage in strategic discussions. The symposium typically features keynote speakers, panel discussions, and networking opportunities for attendees to connect and exchange ideas. 

The purpose of an executive symposium is to provide a platform for executives to learn from each other and gain new perspectives on the challenges and opportunities facing their industries. The symposium is usually organized around a specific theme or topic, such as emerging technologies, industry disruption, or global business trends.

During this symposium, an interesting point was brought up by Chris Mashburn.  Every month Chris and his team have a meeting involving a "mistake of the month" where everyone, especially him, shares a mistake they made. In Chris’ opinion- which was soundly endorsed by Laura and Syriac- the best companies have cultures where people can feel open to being honest and owning mistakes. Now, we’ve gone over the process of building and maintaining- a company culture that embraces mistakes, but how much is this actually used, and what else can companies use to enhance not only their culture but their public image as well? 

When a company acknowledges its mistakes openly, it can earn the appreciation of the public in several ways. First, it demonstrates honesty and transparency, which can build trust with customers and stakeholders. Second, taking steps to rectify a mistake and prevent it from happening again can improve customer satisfaction and loyalty. Third, openly acknowledging mistakes can lead to a strengthened brand reputation, positioning the company as a leader in its industry and a trusted partner. Finally, increased employee morale can result from a company committed to doing the right thing and creating a positive impact, which can lead to long-term benefits for the company.

One example of a company that openly acknowledges its mistakes is Buffer, a social media management platform. In 2013, Buffer suffered a major security breach that resulted in the exposure of its users' passwords. Rather than trying to sweep the incident under the rug, Buffer's CEO, Joel Gascoigne, published a detailed blog post explaining what had happened, how the company was responding, and what it was doing to prevent similar breaches in the future.

Gascoigne's transparency and accountability earned him praise from both customers and industry experts. Buffer's users appreciated the company's honesty and commitment to fixing the problem, and the incident ultimately strengthened their loyalty to the brand.

Another example is Starbucks, which famously closed all of its stores for a day in 2018 to conduct anti-bias training following an incident where two black men were arrested in one of its Philadelphia locations. In addition to the training, Starbucks issued a public apology and announced a series of policy changes to prevent similar incidents from happening in the future.

By acknowledging its mistake and taking swift action to address it, Starbucks demonstrated its commitment to creating a culture of inclusivity and respect for all customers. The incident prompted a national conversation about racial bias in public spaces and positioned Starbucks as a leader in the fight against discrimination.

In 2015, Volkswagen admitted to cheating on emissions tests for its diesel cars. The company's CEO, Martin Winterkorn, publicly apologized and resigned shortly after. Volkswagen also agreed to pay billions of dollars in fines and compensation to affected customers.

In 2016, Wells Fargo was fined $185 million for opening millions of fake customer accounts. The company's CEO, John Stumpf, faced intense criticism and eventually resigned. The company also launched a public apology campaign and implemented new policies and procedures to prevent similar issues from occurring in the future.

In the 1970s, Nestle faced a boycott over its marketing of baby formula in developing countries, which was found to be contributing to infant malnutrition and mortality. The company responded by introducing new marketing practices and donating millions of dollars to infant nutrition programs. Nestle also established the Nestle Infant Formula Audit Commission, which monitors the company's compliance with international marketing standards.

In 2018, Facebook faced intense criticism after it was revealed that Cambridge Analytica had accessed the personal data of millions of Facebook users without their consent. The company's CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, publicly apologized and testified before Congress. Facebook also launched new privacy controls and policies to prevent similar incidents from occurring in the future. We are also currently seeing settlements for users as a result of this.

What most of these companies have in common is that they are all massive companies that are present to this day, despite suffering from major accidents and public relations events. By acknowledging these mistakes, they were able to salvage their reputation and preserve their customers.

Mistakes happen, and that’s okay for the business, so long as they are handled appropriately. Ambition In Motion believes in this so strongly that they are hosting an Executive Symposium on How to Build a Culture of Embracing Mistakes.

If you are interested in going to the next Ambition in Motion Executive Symposium, click here! Our next event will be on Thursday, July 27th, 2023, from 5-8pm CDT. Participants will be able to enjoy hors d’oeuvres while networking with leaders, practice working through case studies with other executives, and get to learn from 3 distinguished panelists on how they have been able to effectively build a culture of embracing mistakes, and what mistakes they have made to get to the point that they are at now.

Unable to attend this event? No worries! Click here to stay updated on future events, and to see information about our previous events. For any questions regarding these symposiums, please contact [email protected]



Fri 12 May 2023
Starting a new job can be an exciting and overwhelming experience. From meeting new colleagues to learning the ins and outs of a company, there are many new things to adjust to. For managers and leaders, it's important to understand how their employees feel during this onboarding period, and to provide the necessary support to help them succeed. Unfortunately, not all managers prioritize this aspect of leadership. 

Recently, a new hire, Samantha, at a Fortune 500 company was excited to start her new job as a marketing coordinator at a tech startup. She had high hopes and was eager to prove herself. However, when Samantha arrived on her first day, she was given a brief orientation and then left to figure things out on her own.

She didn't know who to turn to for guidance or how to navigate the company's systems. Samantha felt lost and unsupported, and it wasn't long before she began to feel frustrated and discouraged. Within a week and a half, Samantha quit her job.

This scenario highlights the importance of guidance and support for new employees. Managers and leaders must take the time to onboard and provide clear direction to new hires. Without proper guidance, employees like Samantha can quickly become overwhelmed and feel unsupported, leading to a high turnover rate.

The first 90 days of employment are critical for new hires as they adjust to their new work environment, culture, and expectations. It's important for managers to make the onboarding process as smooth and welcoming as possible to set the tone for a successful work experience. This includes checking in regularly with new employees to understand how they're feeling and what support they may need. When employees feel that their manager cares about their experience, they're more likely to feel engaged, committed, and productive.

It's crucial for managers to understand that the first few weeks of an employee's new job are crucial to their success in the role. By providing guidance and support, managers can help new hires feel more comfortable and confident in their new position, which can lead to increased job satisfaction and better long-term retention rates.

What steps can managers take to improve the onboarding process?

Managers can take several steps to support new employees and better understand their feelings during the onboarding period. 
  1. First and foremost, they should make themselves available for questions and provide clear expectations for what is expected of the employee. Regular check-ins can also help managers understand how the employee is feeling and address any concerns or challenges they may be facing. 

2. Additionally, providing opportunities for employees to meet with other team members and learn about the company culture can also be beneficial.

3. AIM Insights is a tool that can help managers track and understand the first 90-day onboarding period for new employees. AIM Insights is a platform that allows managers and leaders to gain insights into their team's performance and engagement levels, and provides actionable steps to improve their team's success. One of the most important features of AIM Insights is its ability to track the onboarding progress of new employees.

Through the use of surveys and other assessment tools, AIM Insights helps managers understand how new employees feel about their onboarding experience. This allows managers to identify any potential issues and take proactive steps to address them before they become bigger problems. For example, if a new employee feels overwhelmed by their workload or doesn't feel like they have received enough guidance, AIM Insights can help managers identify these issues early on and provide the necessary support to help the employee succeed.

In addition to helping managers understand how new employees feel, AIM Insights can also help new employees adjust to their new workplace. By providing personalized coaching and mentoring, AIM Insights can help new employees develop the skills they need to succeed in their role and feel more confident in their abilities. This can help new employees feel more comfortable in their new workplace and can improve their overall job satisfaction.

With the help of AIM Insights, managers can avoid similar situations and ensure that their new employees are set up for success. By tracking the onboarding progress of new employees and providing personalized coaching and mentoring, AIM Insights can help managers identify any potential issues early on and provide the necessary support to help new employees succeed.


Mon 24 April 2023
Change is an essential part of any organization, and it is crucial for growth and development. However, employees who have been with a company for 10+ years can be resistant to change. They may be set in their ways and comfortable with the current processes and procedures. This resistance can be a significant obstacle for companies looking to innovate and improve. 

  1. Communicate the Need for Change

One of the most important things you can do to get employees to embrace change is to communicate the need for it. When employees understand why a change is necessary, they are more likely to be receptive to it. It is essential to be clear about the reasons for the change and how it will benefit the company.

For example, if you are introducing a new software program, explain how it will streamline processes and save time. If you are changing the company's mission statement, explain how it will better align with the company's goals and values. By providing a clear and compelling reason for the change, you can help employees see the bigger picture and understand why it is necessary.

2. Involve Employees in the Change Process

When employees feel like they are part of the change process, they are more likely to embrace it. Involve them in the decision-making process and ask for their input. This will make them feel valued and give them a sense of ownership over the change. When employees feel that their voices are heard and their opinions matter, they are more likely to be invested in the change.

For example, if you are introducing a new performance review system, involve employees in the selection process. Ask for their feedback on the options and what they would like to see in the new system. When employees are part of the decision-making process, they are more likely to buy into the change and support it. 

When employees are part of the decision-making process, this follows the Democratic Leadership Goleman Style. This method completely enables all members of a team to participate in the decision-making progress. Any member can potentially come in with an idea and can determine whether or not the idea is worth going forth with by using a consensus amongst other members, along with a final ruling by a leader. Democratic Leadership is particularly useful at getting team member involvement and retaining staff, but has a flaw in its speed, often taking time to come up with decisions. This can be dangerous when quick decisions are required to be made. 

3. Provide Training and Support

Change can be intimidating, especially if it requires learning new skills or processes. To help employees adjust to the change, it is essential to provide them with the necessary training and support. This will make them feel more confident and capable, which will increase their willingness to embrace change.

For example, if you are introducing a new software program, provide employees with comprehensive training on how to use it. This could include online tutorials, in-person training sessions, or one-on-one coaching. When employees feel comfortable using the new program, they are more likely to embrace it and use it to its fullest potential. 

Certain platforms, such as AIM Insights often are delivered to businesses with training packages or training professionals included in their respective packages. Opening these up to your staff can alleviate confusion and create more buy-in as well. 

In addition to this, we strongly recommend pushing your corporate education sponsorships and similar benefits towards your employees. This builds high amounts of employee buy-in loyalty and will allow for a better trained employee base as well.

4. Celebrate Successes

When employees successfully adapt to the change, it is essential to acknowledge and celebrate their efforts. This will help reinforce the idea that change is positive and encourage others to embrace it as well. Celebrating successes can also help create a sense of momentum and excitement around the change.

For example, if you are introducing a new project management system, celebrate when the first project is successfully completed using the new system. This could include a team lunch or a shoutout in the company newsletter. By celebrating successes, you are showing employees that their efforts are appreciated and that the change is having a positive impact.

5. Address Concerns and Resistance

Even with the best communication, involvement, training, and support, some employees may still be resistant to change. It is essential to address their concerns and resistance head-on. It is crucial to listen to their concerns and take them seriously. By doing so, you can identify any potential roadblocks and develop strategies to overcome them.

For example, if an employee is resistant to using a new software program, find out why. Perhaps they are not confident with their computer skills or have had a bad experience with a similar program in the past. By understanding their concerns, you can provide additional training or support to help them overcome their resistance.


In conclusion, getting employees who have been with the company for 10+ years to embrace change can be a challenge, but it's not impossible. The key is to communicate the reasons for change, involve employees in the change process, provide training and support, and recognize and reward those who embrace the change. By following these tips, companies can successfully navigate the challenges of change management and create a culture of continuous improvement that benefits both employees and the organization as a whole. Embracing change is crucial for companies to remain competitive, and by working together, all employees can contribute to a successful transition.



Mon 24 April 2023
Embracing mistakes is critical for leaders who want to build a successful team and a strong culture for several reasons.

First, it fosters a growth mindset. When leaders and team members are open to mistakes, they are more likely to view them as learning opportunities rather than failures. This mindset encourages experimentation, creativity, and risk-taking, all of which are essential for innovation and growth. In contrast, a culture that fears mistakes can stifle creativity and discourage team members from taking risks.

Embracing mistakes encourages transparency and accountability. When leaders share their own mistakes with their teams, it creates a sense of vulnerability and honesty. This type of transparency helps to build trust between leaders and team members and fosters a culture of accountability. When team members know that mistakes will be acknowledged and addressed, they are more likely to take responsibility for their own actions and work collaboratively to find solutions to problems.

It also helps to break down hierarchies and power structures within organizations. When leaders are willing to admit to mistakes, it sends a message that everyone is fallible and that no one is above making mistakes. This type of culture encourages open communication and collaboration, as team members feel more comfortable sharing their own ideas and perspectives.

When team members are encouraged to view mistakes as learning opportunities, they are more likely to bounce back from setbacks and failures. This resilience can help to strengthen the team's ability to overcome challenges and adapt to change.

After all, the way we respond to mistakes can have a significant impact on our personal and professional growth. In many workplaces, there is a culture of fear surrounding mistakes. Employees may try to hide their mistakes from their supervisors, or they may feel embarrassed and ashamed when they do make a mistake. This culture of fear can lead to a lack of innovation, low morale, and decreased productivity. On the other hand, building a culture that embraces mistakes can lead to growth, innovation, and a stronger sense of team unity.

So, how can leaders build a culture that embraces mistakes? One important step is for leaders to share their own mistakes with their teams. When leaders are transparent about their own mistakes, it sends a message that mistakes are not something to be ashamed of, but rather an opportunity for growth and learning. Sharing mistakes also helps to break down the hierarchy that can exist in some workplaces. When leaders admit to making mistakes, it shows that they are human and can help to create a more collaborative and supportive work environment.

Another way to build a culture that embraces mistakes is to recognize and celebrate when team members make mistakes. This may seem counterintuitive, but when we acknowledge mistakes, we take away the shame and embarrassment that can be associated with them. When team members know that their mistakes will be recognized and celebrated, they are more likely to take risks and try new things. This can lead to increased innovation and growth for both individuals and the team as a whole.

Of course, it is also important to learn from mistakes. When mistakes happen, it is essential to take the time to reflect on what happened and why. This reflection can help individuals and teams to identify areas for improvement and develop strategies to avoid similar mistakes in the future. Leaders can help facilitate this reflection by creating a safe space for team members to discuss their mistakes and share what they have learned.

In addition to reflection, it is important to take action to prevent similar mistakes from happening in the future. This may involve implementing new processes, providing additional training, or making changes to policies and procedures. When team members see that their mistakes are being taken seriously and that action is being taken to prevent similar mistakes in the future, it reinforces the message that mistakes are opportunities for growth, not something to be feared.

Building a culture that embraces mistakes requires ongoing effort and commitment. It is not something that can be achieved overnight, but rather a process that requires consistent attention and reinforcement. Leaders can help to reinforce this culture by consistently modeling the behaviors they want to see in their team members, recognizing and celebrating mistakes, and providing opportunities for reflection and learning.

To build this type of culture, leaders must be willing to share their own mistakes, recognize and celebrate mistakes made by team members, facilitate reflection and learning, take action to prevent similar mistakes in the future, and consistently reinforce the message that mistakes are opportunities for growth. With dedication and commitment, leaders can create a work environment where mistakes are not feared, but rather embraced as a natural part of the learning process.


Mon 17 April 2023
With the ChatGPT revolution upon us, many business leaders have been wondering if there can be a productive application of AI (artificial intelligence) within their business.

Sure, AI can help students plagiarize an essay into a good grade,
but can it help companies increase their teams’ productivity?

One option that my team at Ambition In Motion has been testing is
integrating AI into our goal setting system via our AIM Insights program.

Here’s how it works. Every month we ask the direct reports of a
leader to input their goals. We ask direct reports to determine their own goals
(as opposed to the manager) because research shows that people who set their
own goals are much more likely to achieve them. 

This has been a great system so far, but one challenge is that not
every employee is adept at consistently setting SMART (Specific, Measurable,
Attainable, Relevant, and Time-bound) goals. The issue is that while most
people can understand the idea of a SMART goal, it takes practice to get
comfortable setting and achieving SMART goals each month. 

Some managers believe that their employees are incapable of
setting SMART goals. In those cases, those managers are likely micromanaging
and haven’t figured out how to find a balance between their perfectionist
ideals and the practical reality. People are more than just automatons, and
that kind of treatment builds resentment and enables reactive behavior instead
of proactive behavior. 

Employees that can independently set their own SMART goals have a
massive ripple effect on the entire company. When employees set their own SMART
goals, their leader trusts them and doesn’t need to be constantly looking over
their shoulder to make sure they are on track. 

When leaders aren’t constantly looking over their direct reports’ shoulders,
they can effectively lead more people and focus on tasks that can have a
multiplying effect on the business. 

Lastly, both leaders and employees can achieve greater balance
with their work. As opposed to checking, re-checking, and re-checking again a
direct report’s work, the time both leaders and employees are working can be
effectively utilized and allow them to stop working at reasonable hours.

How do we get to a point where employees are autonomously setting
their own SMART goals?

AI!

When a manager sets goals with their direct reports, the manager
thinks that their direct reports are fully participating in the goal-setting
process but in reality, that manager is setting the goals for their direct
reports. Essentially, those managers are enabling their direct reports to not
think for themselves and come up with their own goals and instead tell them
what they want them to do.

This is micromanagement.

The best leaders share an objective that their team needs to
achieve and the key results that they believe it takes to achieve that outcome.
They then empower their direct reports to achieve those key results in whatever
fashion they deem fit. Remember, you are paying these people for their skills
and expertise: learn to trust their instincts.

This leadership style works when direct reports know how to
effectively set SMART goals. It falls flat when employees don’t know how to set
SMART goals.

The reason why AI can be so powerful in this process is the
immediacy of the feedback.

Behavior change and positive habit formation occur when one’s
pattern is disrupted and the feedback they receive is immediate.

Leaders could make themselves available immediately after a direct
report has set their goals to share their feedback on whether the goal is SMART
or not, but that is incredibly time-intensive and not conducive to the leader
achieving their own tasks that they need to focus on. There is interesting
research from Cal Newport on the mental residue people build when they switch
tasks throughout the day. If a leader were to take this route and make
themselves available every time an employee sets a new goal, they would be
constantly switching tasks, building mental residue, and diminishing their own
productivity.

Essentially, leaders are busy and there needs to be a better way
for employees to get immediate feedback on their goals.

AI changes all of that with the immediacy of feedback. In our AIM
Insights program, when employees set goals every month, our AI integration
gives those employees immediate feedback as to whether or not their goal is
SMART. If it is SMART, AIM Insights gives immediate positive reinforcement to
employees that their goal is SMART. If it is not SMART, AIM Insights gives
employees suggestions on how they can re-write that goal as a SMART goal. 

This AI integration into AIM Insights has increased the number of
SMART goals set by employees, their ability to autonomously set SMART goals on
their own, and subsequently, those employees’ and leaders’ productivity.

The ripple effect ramifications from this type of innovation can
be huge for the productivity of teams. Sure, employees will be more productive
in less time worked, but they will also be more resilient. 

Employees (and really everyone) tend to be resistant to change, so
when a company pivots their business model or the way they work, there is
always some amount of resistance that is met with the proposed change. 

When the process in which employees set goals doesn’t change, only
the objective, they are more likely to embrace the change in direction because
the way in which they set goals and achieve key results doesn’t change. The way
in which they work doesn’t materially change, only the objective and key results.
This makes for a more resilient team and that’s able to adapt to change. 

This can positively affect the way in which companies integrate
people and strategies during mergers and acquisitions, enter new business
opportunities and markets, succession plan and promote people, and any other
action that might disrupt the way in which employees currently work.

Companies and leaders that can quickly adopt AI into productive
applications will give themselves a major boost into the future.

Wed 12 April 2023
As a leader, one of the most powerful tools in your arsenal is the power of framing. How you frame a message can have a significant impact on how it is received and can ultimately determine whether or not you achieve your desired outcome. In this blog post, we'll explore the concept of framing and provide some informative tips on how to use it effectively.

What is framing?
Framing is the process of defining the meaning of a message by selecting certain aspects of it and highlighting them while ignoring others. This can be done in a variety of ways, including through the use of language, images, or other visual cues.
Upload your picture so we can use it for facial recognition software? Hard no. Upload your picture so we can show you what you will look like in 30 years? Yes. By framing their request in terms of wanting to see what you'll look like in 30 years, they are able to achieve their desired outcome of obtaining your photo, which they can then use for any purpose. However, if they had simply asked for your photo for facial recognition purposes, they may not have been as successful.

Why is framing important for leaders?
As a leader, you are constantly communicating with your team, whether it's in the form of emails, presentations, or one-on-one conversations. How you frame your message can have a significant impact on how it is received and can ultimately determine whether or not you achieve your desired outcome.
Framing is essential for leaders because it helps shape how individuals perceive and understand information. A leader's ability to effectively frame an issue or situation can significantly impact how their team members respond, engage, and work towards achieving common goals.
A leader who frames an issue in a positive and productive manner can help to foster a sense of optimism, inspiration, and motivation within their team. Conversely, a leader who frames an issue in a negative, pessimistic, or divisive manner can create a sense of disengagement, apathy, and demotivation.
By framing your message in a way that resonates with your team and highlights the benefits to them, you can increase the chances of success and create a more positive working environment. For example, by highlighting the benefits of a project or task, a leader can motivate team members to work harder and more efficiently. Similarly, by framing challenges as opportunities for growth and learning, a leader can encourage team members to develop new skills and approaches, leading to increased productivity.
Effective framing also helps to create a shared sense of purpose and direction among team members, which can further enhance productivity. When everyone is aligned on the same goals and understands how their work contributes to achieving those goals, they are more likely to be motivated and productive.


Here are 5 tips for using framing effectively as a leader:

Know your audience
Before you start framing your message, it's important to know your audience. What are their needs, desires, and fears? How can you frame your message in a way that speaks to them and addresses their concerns?
For example, if you're trying to sell a new product to your team, you'll want to frame your message in a way that highlights the benefits of the product and how it can make their lives easier. If you're addressing a sensitive issue, such as layoffs, you'll want to frame your message in a way that acknowledges the impact on your team and highlights any support that will be provided.

Highlight the benefits
One of the most effective ways to frame your message is to highlight the benefits to your team. How will this message benefit them? What positive outcomes can they expect?
For example, if you're asking your team to work overtime to meet a tight deadline, you'll want to frame your message in a way that highlights the importance of the project and the positive impact it will have on the company.

Use positive language
The language you use can have a big impact on how your message is received. Using positive language can help create a more positive and motivating environment.
For example, instead of saying "We can't afford to fail on this project," you could say "We have a great opportunity to succeed on this project and make a real impact."

Address potential objections
Before you start framing your message, think about any potential objections your team might have. How can you address these objections in your framing?
For example, if you're announcing a new policy that might be unpopular, you could acknowledge the potential concerns and provide reassurance that you're working to address them.

Practice, practice, practice
Finally, it's important to practice your framing skills. Take the time to practice framing your message in different ways and getting feedback from your team. This will help you refine your skills and become a more effective communicator.

The power of framing is an essential tool for any leader. By using the right language, highlighting the benefits, and addressing potential objections, you can create a more positive and motivating environment that helps you achieve your goals. So the next time you need to communicate with your team, take the time to think about how you want to frame your message.


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